Monthly Program: “Climate Change & Redlands Water Supply” April 25

Monthly Program: “Climate Change & Redlands Water Supply” April 25

 

reservoir pump plant 1915

Richard Corneille, Speaker

Monday April 25, 2016, 7pm

Assembly Room, A.K. Smiley Public Library

125 W. Vine Street

Despite the predictions of a dire difficult wet winter Redlands and the southland continue in the drought.  The Redlands Area Historical Society program for April 25th, 7:00 p.m. in the A.K. Smiley Library Assembly Room will address the issue of water supply in Redlands by Richard Corneille.  Corneille is the past Director of Municipal Utilities for the City of Redlands.

Corneille is a graduate of the University of Vermont with a civil engineering degree.  His first job was for the environmental consulting engineering firm of Metcalf & Eddy in Boston.   In 1975, he worked in Saudi Arabia on a variety of water supply and wastewater treatment projects.  Returning to the United States, Corneille obtained professional engineering registration in California, Arizona and Nevada.

In 1986, Corneille accepted a job with the City of Redlands responsible for the City’s water and wastewater facilities from 1986-1989.   He joined the Camp Dresser & McKee international consulting engineering firm in 1989 until his retirement in 2012.   This appointment involved groundwater replenishment for the Orange County Water District, Owens Valley dust mitigation, and the Machado Lake Ecosystem Rehabilitation project.

Since 2005, Richard Corneille has served on the board of the San Bernardino Valley Water Conservation District and has been president since 2012.  This organization is responsible for water spreading to refill the Bunker Hill Basin aquifer.

Corneille has a depth of water supply knowledge to understand the sources of Redlands water supply and the impact the drought has on that supply.   His power point presentation presents the climate here since 1884, groundwater basin, State Water Project and water use in the eastern San Bernardino Valley.

Historical Society programs are free and open to the public.